Georgia Lawsuit May Allow Rare Glimpse Into Its Elections

The big-ticket races in Georgia, which drew national attention, have been decided — but the battle over the controversial way the state runs its elections rages on. A lawsuit contesting the outcome of the lieutenant governor’s race could provide a rare glimpse into the Peach State’s elections infrastructure and an opportunity to audit its non-transparent voting machines.

The lawsuit, filed by an election integrity group and three Georgia citizens Friday night, will attempt to prove that there were enough irregularities “as to place doubt in the result,” as state law requires for an election contest. At issue are unusual election results that the lawsuit says can only be explained by voting machine malfunctions. To prove that something is wrong, the plaintiffs will need to conduct detailed reviews of the internal memory and programming of DRE voting machines, a level of access that has never been allowed in Georgia…

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Georgia Runoff Will Likely ‘Contaminate’ Voting Machines As Evidence

This week, election officials across Georgia are going to break a rule in the election code and tamper with potential evidence as they prepare for December’s runoff and special elections, just as they have since 2002.

The rule in question mandates the maintenance of the internal memory of voting machines for one month after an election. The problem is that Georgia has an election schedule that makes that rule essentially impossible to enforce. Runoffs, like the one coming up on December 4, often happen within a month of the main election…

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Federal Election Comes Down to Which Votes Won’t Be Counted

Desiree Paula Martindale was visiting her children in New Jersey and knew she wouldn’t be back in Georgia until December, so in mid-October she decided to send an absentee ballot in the mail.

While she did her part, it is still unclear one week after the election whether her vote will be counted. And that is not sitting well with her. Reached in New Jersey Tuesday morning, the 82-year-old, originally from Guyana, said she was “irritated…”

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79,784 Requested Mail-In Ballots Have Not Been Counted in Georgia

When polls opened on Election Day, 79,784 Georgians who requested an absentee, mail-in ballot had not returned their ballot and have not voted early. WhoWhatWhy’s exclusive reporting allows those voters to check the status of their votes while there’s just enough time to still get to the polls.

Among all voters who have been issued a ballot but have not yet voted, 44.1 percent are black, 36.6 percent are white, and 5.4 percent are Asian or Pacific Islander…

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Brian Kemp and His Staff Caught in a String of Falsehoods

Since WhoWhatWhy exclusively revealed major security gaps in Georgia’s voter registration and voter information websites — vulnerabilities severe enough to potentially compromise the election — the secretary of state’s office has made a series of statements that are unfounded and, frequently, outright false.

Brian Kemp is the Republican candidate for governor in Tuesday’s election against Democrat Stacey Abrams. But he is also Georgia’s secretary of state, putting him in charge of the state’s elections mechanism while also competing in the marquee contest…

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Jim Crow–Era Voter Suppression Still Widely Accepted

Going to jail for voting has become a real concern for some Georgians, like Pamela Winn.

Until this week, Winn was worried about casting her own ballot. She’s registered. She knows the politicians and the issues. But she has a felony conviction, too.

Winn’s fears have been stoked by a spate of cases across the country where people have been prosecuted for voting while still on state supervision — despite the fact that none of those votes altered the outcome of any election and the voters did not know it was illegal for them to cast a ballot…

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Kemp’s Aggressive Gambit to Distract From Election Security Crisis

When Georgia Democrats were alerted to what they believe to be major vulnerabilities in the state’s voter registration system Saturday, they contacted computer security experts who verified the problems. They then notified Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s lawyers and national intelligence officials in the hope of getting the problems fixed.

Instead of addressing the security issues, Kemp’s office put out a statement Sunday saying he had opened an investigation that targets the Democrats for hacking.

Kemp’s statement has become top news nationwide, but the context and background have yet to be reported — so we are providing it below…

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This story became national news. My reporting was cited by the AP, Bloomberg, CNN, The Guardian, McClatchy, NBC, ProPublic, Slate, and other national outlets. The Washington Post and the New York times followed suit and published their own stories.

Exclusive: Georgia’s Voter Registration System Like ‘Open Bank Safe Door’

Two days before the midterm elections, a series of security vulnerabilities have been discovered that would allow even a low-skilled hacker to compromise Georgia’s voter registration system and, in turn, the election itself. It is not known how long these vulnerabilities have been in place or whether they have already been exploited.

Just before noon on Saturday, a third party provided WhoWhatWhy with an email and document, sent from the Democratic Party of Georgia to election security experts, that highlights “massive” vulnerabilities within the state’s My Voter Page and its online voter registration system…

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After this story was published, then Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp and gubernatorial candidate, opened an investigation into the Democratic Party of Georgia. Kemp’s office claimed, without evidence, that the Democrats attempted to hack the election. My reporting showed that this was entirely false. The next story we ran led national coverage in showing that Kemp’s office knew about the vulnerabilities before the Democrats, and showed that the weaknesses in the election system were severe enough to put the election results in jeopardy. 

In-Person, Early Voting Surges Amid Concerns Over Absentee Ballots in Tight Governor’s Race

Georgia’s race for governor is the closest and most closely watched in the country. Many of the nation’s starkest partisan lines are drawn across the face of this election.

Some of the longest lines, too — as citizens, some alarmed by WhoWhatWhy’s reports on rejection of absentee ballots, decided to go to the polls during the state’s first week of early, in-person voting…

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